Painting a mask

      Maybe you should try a matte varnish, like Mr.Superclear, because it won't do harm to paint or plastic, so it may be a good option. I used to customize a type of doll called Pullip, and the plastic was very sensitive, so we had to use a certain type called Mr.Superclear to seal everything in, so maybe try some of that. But i used a muni muni, and since the plastic they are made out of is one color,( with the exception of the white inside shell) i didn't need to paint it. But when my own 3-d printed mask is finally printed, i think im gonna spray paint it and seal it with Mr.SuperClear. Make sure to get the matte kind. *airbrush, not spray paint sorry

      Post was edited 3 times, last by “NinaKig” ().

      In general, you need to do proper sanding of the mask first in order to make the primer stick to the surface, I use Mr. Base White 1000. For the proper kig pink, you mix Mr. Color 111 and 112 in a 2:1 ratio, then dilute it 1:3 with thinner, and put it into your airbrush gun, spray it evenly on your mask. Also don't forget to let everything dry a day inbetween layers, for a matte finish I use Mr. Color Spray S30.
      Trials and tribulations of painting.

      I saw in your other thread @NekoKig the topcoat dissolved? the base color coat?
      Did it wrinkle or discolor? No details on that I can only assume you were mixing acrylic color coat with a lacquer topcoat.
      Those two finishes tend to fight each other with the lacquer being a more aggressive paint.

      It is better to use "LIKE" paints. If painting with acrylic then stick with a acrylic topcoat. Same with lacquer based paints like Mr. Color.

      After all the sanding, filling, priming and dust remember to wetsand the surfaces with a grit no less than a 320. Remember grit get courser the smaller the number.

      I prefer using Mr. Color, being a lacquer base, coats can be done quickly and a mask can be completed in a day. There's no need to wait more than 45 minutes between coats.
      The one thing I've found though here in the studio is Mr. Color though a very stable medium to use can fail at times due to over coating a surface. This can cause checking, or surface cracking. This is a problem with beginning finishers but it isn't the end of the world and it isn't a reflection on the skill or character of the person applying the paint (gaslighting happens)
      Just sand down the shell and start over. Remember "thin coats".

      Currently the studio only uses Mr. Color with highlights, makeup and embellishments. I've found the small jars to be great for beginners but in a production studio we need more than an ounce of paint at a time for spraying so after the move to Nevada we switched over to a Pre-Cad 2K medium (which you don't have to worry about since you're a beginner)

      When in Japan a couple years ago I discovered, after being invited to their studios, that Japanese Makers use the same combination as I do here which was validating. Their fleshtones are mixed a liter at a time (I use quarts), Makeup and painted surface embellishments all done with Mr. Color. So it's not rocket science, magic or unicorn farts. Just a consistent use of proven products.

      Keep up the great work @NekoKig!
      Yes, I used acrylic color coat with a laquer topcoat and it looks like the ground of a dessert with all the wrikles and cracks in it. But much smaller.

      Thank you for all the feedback. I see everyone in this Forum is very kind.

      I hope this thread will also help the next person who wants to build a mask. If someone has new input for this thread or wants to share something about this topic, just do it. Because this thread isn't just for me. It's for everyone.
      You can coat acrylic with a lacquer topcoat, I have because I already knew to two mediums were incompatible.
      There is a work around.
      First, insure the base coat of acrylic is fully cured.
      Next, spray the topcoat lightly almost dry using lacquer's ability to dry quickly the acrylic has no time to soften and react to the topcoat.

      Not really the best way to complete a mask but at the time I was not finding acrylic topcoats the were were dead flat. (10 years ago)
      Um, I have a question as well, I was wondering after it is painted, Where exactly do you get a matching zentai for the mask, and do you buy the zentai first and then make the airbrush paint match it, or do you paint it first and then try and find a zentai. Once again, If you use the Mr.Color option, where do you find a matching zentai? Do you guys know of any places to find a matching color for the Mr.Color option? If you do please let me know. Thank you!

      NinaKig wrote:

      Um, I have a question as well, I was wondering after it is painted, Where exactly do you get a matching zentai for the mask, and do you buy the zentai first and then make the airbrush paint match it, or do you paint it first and then try and find a zentai. Once again, If you use the Mr.Color option, where do you find a matching zentai? Do you guys know of any places to find a matching color for the Mr.Color option? If you do please let me know. Thank you!



      Simple answer @NinaKig Hadatai first then match the paint.
      You'll need to mixup the colors
      Mr Color
      2-3 parts white #62
      1 part Character flesh #112
      1 part Character flesh #111

      to bring up the pinks you'll need to "sparingly" add Pink rose #63 it is very strong so add using a toothpick

      This is a base fleshtone you will need to custom mix it to the hadatai you purchase. #63 is used for lips and cheek blush I add Character Red #108 to bring the lips up quicker in a 4:1 pink to red ratio.

      Remember if you are doing makeup to clearcoat.

      good luck, have fun and enjoy animegao kigurumi.