3Dprinter enquiries~

      azusasawako wrote:

      well em...
      just wanna ask if anyone has suggestions for 3D printer?
      For example how much for materials and the printer itself,
      how large is it etc....~~~
      Thanks~


      This Question isn't as straight forward as it seems...

      The price range for a 3D printer is anywhere from $500.00 -$9000.00. There are literally hundreds of choices out there now. much of the pricing depends on how the printer is built. ad sturdier printer will likely cost more but it will also provide higher quality more accurate prints. The other thing is the ability to print larger pieces will increase the price of the printer as well. If you want to print anything accurately that is bigger than a grapefruit you are at least in the $1800.00 range. You should be aware that even "expensive" high end printers require quite a bit of technical expertise to keep them calibrated and running smoothly. 3D printers are like precision tuned instruments and need to be constantly maintained, even so things go wrong quite often.

      Of course this does not include software to create the parts you wish to print. There is "free" software out there that is pretty good but my experience is the commercial software in generally "easier" to use in the long run but it certainly will not be plug and play. 3D printers really are not really ready for the "casual user" yet. They are still in the realm of the tech geek/nerd.

      As far as materials go... There are two main type of plastics people use each with their own unique properties but if you plan on printing masks you will probably want to use ABS which is a much tougher and impact resistant plastic. It is also easier to bond pieces together than PLA the other popular plastic material Both the plastics are in the $40-$60 per kilo range. But as in all things often the cheaper plastic produces poor results due to impurities in the resin or inconsistencies in the filament diameters or formulations batch to batch.

      Over all the materials are not expensive. It is the time it takes to print a part. A basic Kigurumi Mask I would estimate will take 40-60 hours to print not including the time to sculpt it and then section it out to print in the most efficient manner.

      I hope this at least answers a few of your questions..

      Meerah wrote:

      azusasawako wrote:

      well em...
      just wanna ask if anyone has suggestions for 3D printer?
      For example how much for materials and the printer itself,
      how large is it etc....~~~
      Thanks~


      This Question isn't as straight forward as it seems...

      The price range for a 3D printer is anywhere from $500.00 -$9000.00. There are literally hundreds of choices out there now. much of the pricing depends on how the printer is built. ad sturdier printer will likely cost more but it will also provide higher quality more accurate prints. The other thing is the ability to print larger pieces will increase the price of the printer as well. If you want to print anything accurately that is bigger than a grapefruit you are at least in the $1800.00 range. You should be aware that even "expensive" high end printers require quite a bit of technical expertise to keep them calibrated and running smoothly. 3D printers are like precision tuned instruments and need to be constantly maintained, even so things go wrong quite often.

      Of course this does not include software to create the parts you wish to print. There is "free" software out there that is pretty good but my experience is the commercial software in generally "easier" to use in the long run but it certainly will not be plug and play. 3D printers really are not really ready for the "casual user" yet. They are still in the realm of the tech geek/nerd.

      As far as materials go... There are two main type of plastics people use each with their own unique properties but if you plan on printing masks you will probably want to use ABS which is a much tougher and impact resistant plastic. It is also easier to bond pieces together than PLA the other popular plastic material Both the plastics are in the $40-$60 per kilo range. But as in all things often the cheaper plastic produces poor results due to impurities in the resin or inconsistencies in the filament diameters or formulations batch to batch.

      Over all the materials are not expensive. It is the time it takes to print a part. A basic Kigurumi Mask I would estimate will take 40-60 hours to print not including the time to sculpt it and then section it out to print in the most efficient manner.

      I hope this at least answers a few of your questions..


      Let me go with this....I did some research and found objet printers but according to some friends of mine. They claimed that the printer is unable to print a mask as i cannot be printed upright and will fall down when the printing procedures proceed.It would best if someone has bought a printer and could just briefly described their buying procedures ie how they chose it and eventually how to use it.
      Regarding softwares i heard that 3dmax and some programs can build the mask and then the service provider will provide a software for converting the file into their printer's readable format.
      but anyway thanks for your help meerah~~XD

      I

      azusasawako wrote:

      Meerah wrote:

      azusasawako wrote:

      well em...
      just wanna ask if anyone has suggestions for 3D printer?
      For example how much for materials and the printer itself,
      how large is it etc....~~~
      Thanks~


      This Question isn't as straight forward as it seems...

      The price range for a 3D printer is anywhere from $500.00 -$9000.00. There are literally hundreds of choices out there now. much of the pricing depends on how the printer is built. ad sturdier printer will likely cost more but it will also provide higher quality more accurate prints. The other thing is the ability to print larger pieces will increase the price of the printer as well. If you want to print anything accurately that is bigger than a grapefruit you are at least in the $1800.00 range. You should be aware that even "expensive" high end printers require quite a bit of technical expertise to keep them calibrated and running smoothly. 3D printers are like precision tuned instruments and need to be constantly maintained, even so things go wrong quite often.

      Of course this does not include software to create the parts you wish to print. There is "free" software out there that is pretty good but my experience is the commercial software in generally "easier" to use in the long run but it certainly will not be plug and play. 3D printers really are not really ready for the "casual user" yet. They are still in the realm of the tech geek/nerd.

      As far as materials go... There are two main type of plastics people use each with their own unique properties but if you plan on printing masks you will probably want to use ABS which is a much tougher and impact resistant plastic. It is also easier to bond pieces together than PLA the other popular plastic material Both the plastics are in the $40-$60 per kilo range. But as in all things often the cheaper plastic produces poor results due to impurities in the resin or inconsistencies in the filament diameters or formulations batch to batch.

      Over all the materials are not expensive. It is the time it takes to print a part. A basic Kigurumi Mask I would estimate will take 40-60 hours to print not including the time to sculpt it and then section it out to print in the most efficient manner.

      I hope this at least answers a few of your questions..


      Let me go with this....I did some research and found objet printers but according to some friends of mine. They claimed that the printer is unable to print a mask as i cannot be printed upright and will fall down when the printing procedures proceed.It would best if someone has bought a printer and could just briefly described their buying procedures ie how they chose it and eventually how to use it.
      Regarding softwares i heard that 3dmax and some programs can build the mask and then the service provider will provide a software for converting the file into their printer's readable format.
      but anyway thanks for your help meerah~~XD

      I


      Objet printers are in the $250.000 range... and that's with the single base material package. if you want to print in secondary materials its like a $20,000.00 option per material handler .. then there is the cost of the "resins"

      azusasawako wrote:


      Let me go with this....I did some research and found objet printers but according to some friends of mine. They claimed that the printer is unable to print a mask as i cannot be printed upright and will fall down when the printing procedures proceed.It would best if someone has bought a printer and could just briefly described their buying procedures ie how they chose it and eventually how to use it.
      Regarding softwares i heard that 3dmax and some programs can build the mask and then the service provider will provide a software for converting the file into their printer's readable format.
      but anyway thanks for your help meerah~~XD



      There are very few printers that can print something the size of a mask in one piece. And if you do find one there are a whole host of other issues to contend with..as you mentioned support... One would need to build a support structure (like a scaffolding) that would need to be printed along with the mask to keep it upright. That adds to the time and materials used. And as objects get bigger getting them to stay stuck to the build plate also becomes a science in itself.

      What most people do is print large objects in sections and bond them together. I know RTPS is doing this with their masks. But doing this is not always easy as one needs to deal with warpage and delaminating and parts shrinkage issues. Working out the calibrations to minimise those problems are a challenge in itself . Also figuring out where to place the partition lines so they are minimally intrusive and which way to orient the part for the best build results requires some pretty advanced 3d spacial thinking abilities. One could just cut up the piece any way that fits..but a seam right across a high detail area just makes finishing that much harder and even though in theory a 3D printer should be able to print a piece in any position they do print better along certain axis. Much of this type of thinking can be seen in the final construction of the mask which also affects the strength of the shell as well.

      As far as buying procedures, it would be like buying anything else. Research... research... research... 3D printing is a emerging technology. Every week something new comes out and improvements are made... Best thing to do is read. Then from there decide on desired build volume and budget. Then look for something that fits best in those parameters. Although there are a lot of printers out there, there are few enough that there should be a review about any particular printer you are interested in. Remember. Don't base your decision on dollar alone.. Look at the company history and support. There are plenty of fly by night kickstarter manufacturers that may never get beyond the first round of deliveries. And if a part breaks, then what happens?

      Right now the most "stable" printer company is probably Makerbot. But remember they are going proprietary software and parts, and have become a major marketing machine so you pay the premium for that.
      You're not going to find any mainstream printer companies getting into the consumer market for 3d printing..

      And no offense but if you cannot get through two pages of what I wrote 3d printing is not for you. It took me literally a week of technical reading to figure out how to get the finally get the prints to work the way I wanted.

      naomi kig wrote:

      yes i no but there no manufacturers names like hp.
      have done a bit research about it and seen one on ebay but i dont to get one and it not a good one
      (im dyslexic so some time two pages can get confuing for me sorry)


      If you see 3D printer on eBay that claims to be "like " a brand name I would probably consider it as a start and learn machine.. Especially if they are made of wood. They don't have the rigidity to make precise consistant larger prints.

      BTW. Almost all the printers are 'based' on the RepRap/Makerbot model
      at first glance, cool...
      then look at the bed (non heated) can't print abs..
      small size 9x9x5
      maybe good for making small patterns, but nothing like what I need .
      Mattel needs to make one, remember the vac u form?? and the monster maker???
      Yeah... those were cool!!!
      For a hobbyist that has 999 plus tax to blow it may be a nice toy to play with....

      in addition there are software limitations~

      not a great idea to run out a buy one just yet~
      maybe in five years but, by that time we at RTPS will be using ​UV based resin 3d printers!!

      Roen wrote:

      I just saw that Dremel is coming out with a 3D printer of their own. Not sure when or how good it will be tho.


      I think its a great printer for the beginner to get thier feet wet (or rich person that likes toys).... but I am also very sure unless one is just making "trinkets" they will out grow its capabilities very quickly. If you are looking at it and considering making masks (or props) then it will work but you better be pretty patient (and really creative engineering-wise) if you are making large complex multi-part objects.

      azusasawako wrote:



      Let me go with this....I did some research and found objet printers but according to some friends of mine. They claimed that the printer is unable to print a mask as i cannot be printed upright and will fall down when the printing procedures proceed.It would best if someone has bought a printer and could just briefly described their buying procedures ie how they chose it and eventually how to use it.
      Regarding softwares i heard that 3dmax and some programs can build the mask and then the service provider will provide a software for converting the file into their printer's readable format.
      but anyway thanks for your help meerah~~XD

      I


      There are printers (Like Gorilla) with space large enough to print a complete mask. If you are comfortable with sanding you can print the whole mask in one turn (with lots of support material), but better idea is to print front and back halves separatelly.


      You'll be able to place a lock or glue parts togather using bondo or alike filler: just filling and sanding gives you a nice result


      There is an importaint tip of using materials.

      Nylon os a greate material but it's extremely hard to adjust. It will deform during printing procedure.
      ABS is easy to smooth with acetone vapor, easy to work with but you need to carefully control temperature, flow and extrusion speed. And prepare yourself to clean the extrusion elements a lot before you'll find the right adjustments.
      PLA is really easy to adjust (after nylon^^). I personally like it.

      There is another issue, speed. Virtually you can print very fast. But in reality if steppers rotate faster than sertain speed, printer will shift printed pattern unexpectedly. more expencieve printers will allow higher speeds till this "feature" pops up.

      To avoid these problems try looking for SLA printers. While printing parts on FDM is like printing photos on matrix printers, SLA is more like laser printed photography an it's faster. You will understand after 3-day-printing maraphone ^^ And they don't have that speed issue.

      I don't suggest to use printed parts as a final product cause of certain layerd surface.

      Also unless you don't plan to print a complete armor set or a all the Sailors, you don't need a printer (you need a friend with a printer, who lives nearby): cheap ones will needextra work (I bought a printer a year ago and was able to use it for mask project - a set of horns - only 7 month after adjusting and experimenting), expencive ones need certain materials and will cost you like an armor - complete and weathered.
      All my costumes, armor, masks and staff are made by myself. I'm also taking commissions. Worldwide.
      My site: dkag.net
      My Facebook: hikarinaka.DK
      why is that print so "dirty"? It finished up quite nicely tho.


      Have you had any issues with delaminating? Prob not so much with PLA but moreso with ABS. Any suggestions how to counter that?

      And as for using printed parts for final product.. I wouldn't use PLA or nylon ( well maybe nylon) but ABS is fine after finishing.

      If you are having x or y axis creep then you should check your machine and make sure everything is tight. los of rigidity will cause "leaning" every time. Also run a calibration -- there are plenty of calibration models out there -- even a 20mm cube will work. Then make the corrections in your slicer software to take into account and correct any variations in your machine.
      I was at the Twin Cities Maker Faire this weekend while everybody was wending home from Anime North and took a brief gander at the Stratasys show floor.....

      Here ya go.... a brief description of what I missed. The floor models where desktop prototypers, they just hint at the production models. Very neat; instead of getting the full 3-D experience, I was mesmerised watching a little steel ball go around and round......;>..........
      Try knowing a few heteronorms. They'll broaden your horizons without a lot of drama. It's great, try it....'>......